NCIRE - The Veterans Health Research Institute Home  |  Sitemap  |  Intranet  |  UltiPro   Visit our Facebook page  Visit our Twitter page

Give Now
About NCIRE Participate in Research Support Our Mission Careers at NCIRE Contact Us
Veterans Health
Research at NCIRE

NCIRE-The Veterans Health Research Institute is the leading private nonprofit institute devoted to Veterans health research in the United States. Our mission is to advance Veterans health through research.

We support the work of some of the nation's foremost physicians and scientists at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the premier biomedical research facility in the VA system. All have faculty appointments at the University of California, San Francisco, which has its own proud traditions of research and patient care. We also partner with the U.S. Department of Defense to support health research on behalf of our men and women in the Armed Forces.

Those who have served in uniform have given their best for their country. In return, we believe that they deserve nothing less than the best health care research we can provide.

Contact Us
Email NCIRE
Give Now
George H. Caughey, MD

Chief of Pulmonary, Critical Care, Allergy and Sleep Medicine, SFVAMC
Professor of Medicine, UCSF
Email: george.caughey@va.gov

Investigating Inflammatory Cell Enzymes in Lung Diseases

The Caughey lab is interested in understanding how protein-cleaving enzymes of mast cells, white blood cells, and cells lining the airway contribute to inflammation, host defense, tissue remodeling ,and barrier function in the lung. These studies relate to clinical problems in asthma, cystic fibrosis, bronchitis, lung transplantation, and bacterial pneumonia. These areas of research are especially related to veterans who have inhaled toxins, smoke cigarettes, received allografts to treat end-stage lung disease, or have lung and bronchial infections. Dr. Caughey is perhaps best known for his work with mast cells, which play major roles in allergic diseases, including asthma and fatal reactions to bee stings. He has focused on mast cell proteases, which are enzymes that break down proteins. Over the past decade, Dr. Caughey's laboratory has developed several compelling lines of evidence to suggest that these proteases play deleterious roles in allergic diseases. This work has resulted in pharmaceutical development of new classes of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat asthma and other diseases involving mast cells. More recently, he has focused on the positive contributions of mast cells and their proteases to host defense against bacteria and other pathogens, on their role in modulating the inflammatory response to infection, and on defining genetic variation in mast cell protease genes that influence diseases like asthma.

To see Dr. Caughey on Pub Med, click here.